About Telluride

Where to Eat and Drink in Telluride

https://denver.eater.com/maps/best-telluride-restaurants-bars
This tiny Mountain Town might be difficult to get to, but its bustling dining scene far outpaces that of other far larger resorts.

Telluride has only about 2,500 residents, but that small size belies the depth of its dining scene. Here, you can find just about everything you’re craving, from Thai and Mexican to Middle Eastern and New American. There’s also Detroit-style pizza, steak house fare, stacked sandwiches, and damn good bloody marys to discover. Plan your trip, and go taste what this town has to offer.

—Amanda M. Faison

1. Cindybread Artisan Bakery

168 Society Dr
Telluride, CO 81435

(970) 369-1116

You’ll have to hunt to find CindyBread, which is in Lawson Hill, but if you can find Telluride Brewing Company, you can find this locally owned bakery. Most of the breads are baked fresh daily and sandwiches get the royal treatment. Don’t miss the Emma with artichoke hearts, grilled eggplant, tomatoes, roasted red peppers, fresh mozzarella, basil mayo, mixed greens and balsamic vinaigrette tucked between the bakery’s signature tomato focaccia roll. And…there are cookies!

 

2. The Saloon at Gorrono Ranch Restaurant

If you’ve ridden Chair #4 you’ve likely spotted Goronno Saloon from above. The tiny bar is housed in an old wooden outbuilding alongside Goronno Ranch, the lively on-mountain restaurant during ski season. The bar is always busy: it’s a cozy haven on snowy days when the fireplace blazes and it has a line out the cabin door on sunny days. Order what you will—beer, bloody marys, hot toddys, and bask in the rustic vibe.

 

3. There Bar

627 W Pacific Ave
Telluride, CO 81435

(970) 728-1213

Walk by this corner bar on any given night and you’ll be lured in by the seductive lighting, the intimate space, and the promise of good food and drink. Initially folks discovered There while waiting for a table at Siam (the two spots sit cattycorner from one another), but the bar has since come into its own — even spawning a Denver location. Go for small plates and the signature jam cocktails where you pick your spirit and a housemade jam mix-in.

 

4. Siam-Telluride

200 S Davis St
Telluride, CO 81435

(970) 728-6886

Tom kha soup, choo-chee chicken, roti, beef satay…by now anyone’s mouth should be watering. Siam and its Thai-inspired cuisine has garnered a devout following since opening in 2006 and that loyalty will help the restaurant as it navigates new ownership. On a previous visit, the handroll portion of the menu was unavailable but that hasn’t stopped the masses from showing up. Arrive early to nab a table.

 

5. 221 South Oak

221 S Oak St
Telluride, CO 81320

(970) 728-9507

There are times when one reads the description of a dish and you already know there are too many ingredients vying for attention. That is not the case at 221 South Oak, where one-time Top Chef contestant Eliza Gavin mines her Southern upbringing, her years spent cooking in New Orleans and Napa, and her training at culinary school in France for inspiration. Even with so many influences working at once, Gavin has a knack for distilling flavors.

 

6. Chop House Restaurant at New Sheridan

233 W Colorado Ave
Telluride, CO 81435

(970) 728-9100

While most everyone talks of the steaks at this old-school (and expensive) steakhouse, it’s really breakfast you should seek out. Located in the hotel’s grand lobby, the menu includes the usual suspects: omelets, eggs Benedict, house-made granola. The real find is the chilaquiles, and you can add steak tips for an additional $9 to make it all the more hearty. Tip: When the weather is warm, don’t miss heading up to The Roof, Telluride’s only rooftop bar.

 

7. Brown Dog Pizza

110 E Colorado Ave
Telluride, CO 81435

(970) 728-8046

Every town needs its staple pizza spot, and Brown Dog is Telluride’s. Along with Chicago Deep Dish and New York pies, Brown Dog offers Detroit-style pizza, which is rectangular, thick-crusted, and caramelized on the bottom. Don’t miss the award-winning 3-1-3, a white pizza with ricotta, Genoa salami, Calabrian red chiles, sweet piquante peppers, basil, arugula, and shaved Parmigiano Reggiano. If this combo sounds familiar, Denver, that’s because when the owners of Brown Dog opened Blue Pan in West Highland and Congress Park, they made sure that pizza was on the menu.

 

8. La Cocina De Luz

123 E Colorado Ave
Telluride, CO 81435

(970) 728-9355

Mexican food that’s healthy? Or at least healthy-ish and made with whole, mostly organic ingredients? That’s Cocina De Luz. The vibe is casual and order-at-the counter but the food is exquisite — the posole and vegan tamales in particular. Don’t come expecting TexMex, but do visit the chips and salsa bar, check out the fresh-pressed juice menu, and order a scoop of just-churned ice cream.

 

9. Caravan Middle Eastern Food

123 E Colorado Ave
Telluride, CO 81435

(970) 728-5611

For a mountain town of roughly 2,500 it’s remarkable to find a Middle Eastern restaurant that does the cuisine justice. And that’s just what Caravan, a food truck stationed on the La Cocina De Luz patio, set out to do. Browse the menu of lamb kofka, chicken shish kebab, falafel, hummus and know you can’t go wrong — and if you can’t decide, order the mezze vegetarian sampler plate. Bonus: Check out the smoothie menu.

 

 

The 5 Steps of Avalanche Safety

As the snow continues to pile up in Colorado Ski Country, we think it's as good a time as any to provide you with some resources for how to stay safe in the backcountry as well as in-bounds at certain resorts where avalanches could potentially be a hazard.

There are some fantastic resources out there to help you navigate snow hazards, medical hazards, and even human hazards such as poor judgement and decision-making skills in the face of massive lines and fresh tracks. Two great resources to start with are Backcountry Access (BCA) and the American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE)

BCA's website has a page called 'learn avalanche safety' where you can read up on tips for avoiding avalanches, rescuing victims, resources and trainings, as well as enlightening success stories. They also have an avalanche awareness guide for download. Both BCA and AIARE abide by a 5-step method to stay safe in any snow-heavy conditions.

1) GET THE GEAR

Buy quality safety equipment if you're going into the backcountry (beacon, shovel, probe, avalanche airbag, emergency communication device), and have the best gear possible even in the front country in order to prevent potential hazards (first aid kit, extra layers, and maybe even a beacon, shovel, and probe in certain areas). Along with step 4, make sure you have terrain information and photos, a map, a gps device, and a charged smartphone or radio. Whether in the backcountry or front, make sure to practice with your equipment before heading out to avoid encountering an emergency situation and not knowing how to effectively, efficiently, and safely manage it.

2) GET THE TRAINING

Take an avalanche safety and awareness course! They are held all over the state, usually put on by AIARE through community colleges, universities, community centers, gear shops, etc. These courses will help teach you how to read a slope and how to make the necessary decisions to keep you and your group safe in avalanche terrain. They will teach you the technical skills for using the required gear in rescue scenarios as well as the human influences that can change decisions, outlooks, and outcomes.

There are many different courses to choose from, including AIARE I: Three Day Course, AIARE I: Split Course, AIARE I: Hut Trip, AIARE Avalanche Rescue, AIARE II, Avalanche Field Review, and Avalanche Awareness Clinics. Check out avtraining.org for avalanche course dates, providers, resources for instructors, and scholarship opportunities for the training courses. 

Another way to stay safe and ensure the best possible outcomes in any situation is to learn how to provide first aid to a victim, even if the injury was not from an avalanche. There are many different CPR courses happening around the state constantly, so make sure you chose the one that's best for you (courses for the public, for childcare, for healthcare professionals, etc). Search CPR courses in your area: the American Red Cross and CPR Choice Colorado are great websites to find courses all over the state.

Other trainings to obtain are in wilderness medicine such as Wilderness First Aid (WFA) and Wilderness First Responder (WFR). The care required for crises in the backcountry differs from that in the front country because you are farther from immediate, definitive medical care and your contact time with patients is generally higher. These medical trainings, especially WFR, are amazing resources to have, even if you never have to use them in a real emergency. Knowing how to remain calm and feel confident in your training is almost as valuable as the medical knowledge itself. Even if you're shredding the frontcountry, most ski patrol will be grateful to have someone with a little medical knowledge keeping the patient calm and managing any life threats in the time it takes them to reach the scene.

3) GET THE FORECAST

Read the snow report for the last few days: CSCUSA's snow report page is a great resource for this! The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a good spot to find the weather forecast, and the Colorado Avalanche Information Center (CAIC) gives avalanche reports for all areas of the state with new snow, as well as accident reports if there was an avalanche.

4) GET THE PICTURE

Make sure you know the route and research it thoroughly. CalTopo is a great resource for finding and creating personalized topographic maps of your planned route, as well as potential plan B, C, etc. Make a plan before you go of what terrain you aim to be on, what terrain you absolutely will avoid, as well as where you might need to make critical decisions once you get to the slopes.

This point also applies to the front country: know your group's skill level and comfort zones. Taking people out who are not prepared or comfortable in more advanced terrain is the first way that bad stories can happen. Keep everyone safe and happy both in-bounds and out-!

5) GET OUT OF HARM'S WAY

This step mostly entails knowing the dangers and off-limits terrain and avoiding them. If you take any medical courses, one of the first things you will learn is to not create any more victims by putting yourself in danger to rescue someone else. This is good advice while skiing in-bounds as well: don't duck ropes. It's not worth potentially losing your pass and it's certainly not worth a life lost to carelessness. Just because it's still on the resort, doesn't mean it's maintained for avalanche safety. Stay in-bounds if you're in-bounds, and stay safe with as much training and know-how as possible if you're in the backcountry.

...

More of a visual learner? Check out http://avtraining.org/be-avalanche-aware/ to watch these steps played out with real people and their real stories.  

If you are interested in updating First Aid kits, frontcountry gear, or looking into backcountry safety gear, here are some ideas for places to purchase:

No matter where you find yourself on a mountain, whether you're skiing, snowshoeing, hiking, in-bounds, or out-of-bounds, make sure to set yourself up for success. Have the training, have the gear, and remember that ultimately, Mother Nature is in charge. These steps and pointers above will help you have a better, more amiable connection to Her in times of epic pow days. Snow, although it looks like glitter from the sky, isn't magic. If you know what to avoid and how best to stay safe, you can increase your chances of success and an incredible day by huge margins. Stay safe and have fun with all this new fun stuff falling from the sky!

Flight Options Increase for Winter 2018/2019

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Winter Flights Schedule Announced

Flight schedules for Telluride Regional Airport (TEX) and Montrose Regional Aiport (MTJ) have been released. Highlights include United/Boutique to Telluride (TEX), added daily holiday flights from San Francisco (SFO) and New York (EWR), and larger jets on the Dallas (DFW) mainline routes.

We have entered the core booking season for winter, with sales growing each week from now through the beginning of December. Be sure to book early for best options and pricing! 

Boutique Air Comes to Telluride

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BREAKING NEWS: Boutique Air Coming to Telluride Airport

Starting August 29, 2018, Boutique Air will offer year-round service between Denver International Airport (DEN) to Telluride Regional Airport (TEX). 

“Boutique brings a proven, high-quality operation and a worldwide partner network, a great fit for both our community and our guests coming to visit throughout the year,” said Colorado Flights COO Matt Skinner. “We are excited to partner with Boutique and deliver commercial flights to TEX for the destination.”

Even more exciting, Boutique Air is partners with United Airlines offering travelers to book and connect through the global United network. Additionally, passengers can earn and redeem miles for flights through the United Mileage Plus frequent flyer program. 

"Telluride is a world class destination, and we are thrilled to be connecting it to our Denver International hub later this month,” said Boutique CEO Shawn Simpson. 

Visit www.boutiqueair.com, www.kayak.com and at www.united.com to view flight schedules.

Your 7 Day Guide to Telluride

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Recently named the #1 in US News's Best Small Towns to Visit in the USA, Telluride's scenery, cultural events, sunshine, and charm make it a summer favorite. The TREC Team has put together a list of our favorite Telluride activities for every day of the week.

MONDAY

18 Holes at the Telluride Golf Club 

The natural beauty and splendor of the surrounding mountains and wildflowers will take your breath away as you tee off at 9,417 feet. And as one of the country’s highest courses in elevation, the ball travels significantly farther at the Telluride Golf Course (average golfers can drive an estimated 15-25% farther than on a lowlander course). Why? Same reason it’s tougher to breathe; the thin mountain air hosts less oxygen and therefore imposes less resistance on the ball. 

TUESDAY

Bear Creek Trail Hike at S Pine Street

Put on your hiking boots and head up the Bear Creek Trail. A local favorite, this trail goes through the Bear Creek Preserve and ends at the iconic Bear Creek Falls. Hiking musts include sturdy shoes, rain jacket, water, nuts or powerbars, hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen.

WEDNESDAY

Sunset Concert Series  //  Wednesdays 6:00-8:00 pm  //  Sunset Plaza in Mountain Village

From Telluride, take the free gondola up to Mountain Village and enjoy live music while watching the sun set. Bring a blanket & camp chairs or grab a table at a restaurant in the plaza. Food and beverages are available for purchase. 

THURSDAY

Historic Walking Tour  //  Thursdays 1:00-2:00 pm  //  Telluride Historical Museum

Join longtime local Ashley Boling for a fun and lively tour about Telluride. Learn about the people, buildings, and events that make Telluride unique. $15 ($10 for members) Ticket includes free museum admission. Purchase tickets at the museum, online, or by phone, 970-728-3344 

FRIDAY

Telluride Farmers' Market  //  Fridays 10:30 am - 4:00 pm  //  South Oak Street

Since 2002, the Telluride Farmers’ Market (TFM) as been providing the residents and visitor of Telluride and the surrounding area, with access to regionally produced, organic food and crafts from Colorado’s Western Slope. Our favorite picks are the Thai food stand, produce from any of the local farmers, fresh cut flowers, and getting puppy kisses at the Second Chance Humane Society booth.

SATURDAY

Movies Under the Stars  //  Saturdays 8:45 pm  //  Reflection Plaza in Mountain Village

Enjoy an outdoor movie in the cool Rocky Mountain air, lit by stars and moonlight, surrounded by unmatched Telluride/Mountain Village views. Thursday and Saturday nights this summer. Free Admission. Bring your blankets, lawn chairs, and snacks! Full bar and menu service is available.

SUNDAY

Mountain Biking

Our favorite trails are Village Trail and Prospect Trail which are accessible from the San Sophia Gondola Station. Or do a "locals loop" which is Village Trail to Ridge Trail to Jurassic Trail, a stop in Illium at the Brewery or Distillery for a refreshment and refill water bottles, and back to town on the Valley Floor River Trail. Bike rentals are available from Boot Doctors or Telluride Sports, in town or Mountain Village locations.

Mountain Bike Trails Expanding in Telluride

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Telluride Bike Park to Expand to 15 Trails and 17 Miles of Terrain

At a community meeting last week, Telluride Ski Resort announced plans to expand its bike trails. The Telluride Bike Park, set to open June 2019, is currently underway with Telski investing $1 million to build miles of bike trails. Gravity Logic of Whistler, a industry leader, has been hired design and construct the project. 

“The new terrain (inside the park) will be more on the flow side of things. We hired Gravity Logic out of Whistler, the industry leader, to design and construct the park, and they’ve already started,” he said. Ten miles of new terrain will be added.

As with other upper-echelon bike parks, Telluride’s will be monitored by Bike Patrol to aid with mechanical problems and medical emergencies. And, like popular playgrounds, it will charge users to play. The gondola's San Sophia Station already provides access to the existing trails, Village Trail, Prospect Trail, and Basin XC Trail as well as the Mountain Village Bike Park (downhill bike park). Additional uphill access will be provided by Lift 4 (Village Express). 

Photo courtesy of Town of Mountain Village“The industry standard is $36 a day, so that’s what we’ll charge,” Telski CEO Bill Jensen said. “That includes a $1 donation to the National Forest Foundation (NFF), the nonprofit arm of the U.S. Forest Service.” 

The cost, however, will be substantially less for holders of Telski winter season passes: a one-time $25 donation to the NFF, which will grant the donator access to Cross-Country, Freestyle and Technical trails, as well as unlimited rides on Village Express. 

According to Jensen, local donations to NFF, which has a matching awards program, “will come back to us as a community and our trails. The hope is to sell 10,000 single-day tickets and put $30,000 in the coffers of NFF. Telski will make money at some point,” he said, but the short-term goal for the bike park is “to energize Mountain Village in the summer and stimulate the local economy.” 

The resort plans to open Telluride Bike Park the third Saturday in June with daily operation through Labor Day, then moving to Saturday-Sunday operations through the second Sunday in October. Personnel will scan passes at Station San Sophia and atop Village Express from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., which also are the hours for the Bike Park, as well as its patrollers, guides and instructors. 

 

Excerpts from Telluride Daily Planet/Rob Story

 

New Bites: Noodles & Whiskey

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Wood Ear to Open This Weekend in the Roma Building

Texas-flavored ramen joint, Wood Ear Whiskey Lounge & Noodle Bar, is set to open June 24. Matt Arnold -- owner and general manager, and his employees “have resurfaced every inch except for the original walnut bar” (which was crafted by the Brunswick-Balke-Collener Company in 1860).

Wood Ear aims to stay open year-round, with the exception of a week each off-season, and by becoming “a place where everyone can afford to eat,” Arnold said. “People will be shocked by our prices.”

Indeed, Wood Ear’s preliminary menu reveals five items priced not in dollars but cents.

Along with a 25-cent nori sheet or 50-cent pickled carrot, diners will savor $2 charred corn, $4 wasabi potato salad or $5 shrimp tacos. 

Since bar manager Alvin Davis, head chef Kevin Bush and Arnold all hail from Texas, they endeavored to incorporate Hill Country flavors in the menu, meaning warm potato salad, cucumber salad and all kinds of smoked meats, whether brisket, pork shoulder or Asian-barbecue-style porkbelly.  

“We’re trying to bring our own touch to ramen,” Bush said. Lots and lots of ramen, that is:  According to Arnold, Wood Ear will boil 200 pounds of bones per day to create broth for all the ramen entrees on the menu. 

That process will take two days to complete, in order to intensify flavors, as will the smoking of Wood Ear’s brisket. 

Like neighboring restaurants La Cocina de Luz and Butcher & Baker, Wood Ear will operate as a counter-service joint. That way, Arnold said, he can save on employee costs and pass down the savings in the form of, well, 50-cent pickled carrots. 

In early March, Arnold imagined Wood Ear as a “cocktail lounge that serves Japanese-inspired drinking food.” The more the three main players tinkered, though, the more “we amped up our food” offerings, said Arnold. He now describes Wood Ear as a “Texas Hill Country-inspired ramen joint.”

Wood Ear is still obtaining whiskey from the East — just not the Far East. Bar manager Davis has stocked the bar with libations from Vermont’s Whistle Pig distillery instead of the major Japanese exporter because “Suntori is currently the most sought after brand of whiskey, and it rarely makes it off the coasts.”

Wood Ear’s new look will surprise those familiar with its predecessors’ gray-and-black hues. Arnold pointed to an Oregon artist’s fabulous new mural — in which bears snarl as long-stemmed chanterelles stretch for the horizon — and said, “We’ve started calling our motif ‘psychedelic hunting lodge.’”

That sounds about right, given the new wooden paneling: a lively interplay of beetle-killed blue pine, aspen and white pine. 

The mural surrounds the traditional stage of the Roma. The stage, Arnold said, will hold music acts during both Ride Fest and the Telluride Jazz Festival. 

From: Rob Story, Telluride Daily Planet

Festival Seasons Kicks Off with Mountainfilm

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The summer festival season in among us and starts with Mountainfilm. Started in 1979, Mountainfilm is one of America’s longest-running film festivals and a locals’ favorite. Through the years, in and out of trends and fads, the festival has always been best described by one unchanging word: Inspiring. Mountainfilm has evolved into a dynamic organization and a festival of films, people, stories, and ideas that celebrates indomitable spirit, educates and inspires audiences, and motivates individuals and communities to advance solutions for a livable world.

Mountainfilm will kick off its 40th Anniversary Festival by dedicating its Moving Mountains Symposium to one of the most pressing issues of our modern era: migration. To help guide audiences through the topic, the festival has gathered an impressive roster of scholars, activists, humanitarians and climate experts to speak at the event. The half-day symposium, which is scheduled for May 25, 2018 in High Camp Theater, will feature a former UN senior advisor, immigrant leadership advocate, a preeminent author of the American Southwest and expert in forced migration, among others. Speakers will take the audience on a deep dive into several facets of the migration issue, from immigration reform in America to the international refugee crisis and the long history of human movement across the globe.

With first ascents and routes on walls that span from Antarctica to Patagonia and Alaska to the Himalaya, author and North Face athlete Conrad Anker is a modern climbing legend. Anker is Mountainfilm's 2018 Guest Director. This year’s presenters include former festival director Arlene Burns, 2018 poster artist Joseph Toney, filmmaker Tyler Wilkinson-Ray, film producer and writer Anna Brones, and Norwood-based British climber Adrian Burgess. 

Mountainfilm is in the TREC family as Broker Alex Martin's wife, Sage, is Mountainfilm's Executive Director. “Alex and I are so blessed to have the opportunity to live and work in Telluride. The natural beauty is awe-inspiring, and the community genuine. We couldn’t dream of a better place to raise our sons and to call home.” says Sage.

To learn more about Mountainfilm, click here to visit their website. If you want to attend, we're sorry to report that passes are SOLD OUT. But, check out today's Telluride Daily Planet to see how you can Mountainfilm without a pass (and for free!).